Bookselling, May 17

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the fourth event in the spring 2016 series
co-presented by the PEN America Translation Committee


How do you publicize and sell a book in translation? What role do booksellers and independent bookstores play? Is it true readers are wary about picking up foreign writers, or is this just a myth? Does an “it book”, like those by Ferrante or Knausgaard, actually sell well? A panel of expert booksellers and publicists–Miriam Bridenne (Albertine), Kate Garber (192 Books), Hal Hlavinka (Community Bookstore), and Becky Kraemer (Cursive Comms)–discuss these and other questions in the fourth and final event of the Business of Literary Translation series.


Tuesday, May 17, 7PM
The Center for Fiction
17 East 47th Street, between 5th and Madison Aves
http://centerforfiction.org
The event is free but please RSVP here.


Moderator:
Hal Hlavinka is the event coordinator at Community Bookstore in Brooklyn, where he’s hosted authors and translators like Álvaro Enrigue, Natasha Wimmer, Orhan Pamuk, and Luc Sante. His work has appeared in BOMB Magazine, Music & Literature, The Quarterly Conversation, and Golden Handcuffs Review.

Panelists:
After almost two decades in publishing, including working as a publicist for foreign fiction at Actes Sud and a few round trips between Paris and New York, Miriam Bridenne decided to settle down at Albertine Books — a reading room and a bookstore dedicated to books in French and translated from the French — to do what she enjoys most: recommending books she loves. Somehow this also includes taking bizarre pictures for Albertine’s social media outlets.

Kate Garber has worked in a variety of bookstore positions for nearly a decade, and is currently the book buyer at 192 Books in Chelsea (Manhattan). She is also a judge for this year’s Best Translated Book Award in fiction.

Becky Kraemer founded Cursive Communications & Marketing after more than ten years working in trade publishing in positions at Simon & Schuster, Hyperion, and Melville House. Her clients have included British publisher Oneworld Publications and Bloomberg Businessweek. Follow Becky on Twitter at @beckykraemer and online at www.cursivecomms.com.


This is a co-presentation by the Bridge and the PEN America Translation Committee. 

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Contracts, April 19

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the third event in the spring 2016 series
co-presented by the PEN America Translation Committee


Copyright, royalties, fees, recognition, editorial control: Are literary translators getting better contracts than they used to? What are the “best practices”? What influence do authors’ agents have on translators’ contracts? How can translators get help negotiating a contract? Translator Shelley Frisch, publisher Juliet Grames (Soho Press), and agent Jacqueline Ko (The Wylie Agency) join translator Alex Zucker for a discussion of literary translation contracts.


Tuesday, April 19, 7PM
The Center for Fiction

17 East 47th Street, between 5th and Madison Aves
http://centerforfiction.org
The event is free but please RSVP here.


Moderator:
Alex Zucker, cochair of the PEN America Translation Committee, has three translations of Czech authors out in 2016: Tomáš Zmeškal’s Love Letter in Cuneiform (Margellos World Republic of Letters), Josef Jedlička’s Midway Upon the Journey of Our Life (Karolinum Press), and Magdaléna Platzová’s The Attempt (Bellevue Literary Press).

Panelists:
Shelley Frisch’s translations from the German include biographies of Nietzsche, Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, and Kafka, for which she was awarded a Modern Language Association Translation Prize and the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize. Her latest, a dual biography of Marlene Dietrich and Leni Riefenstahl, was named a finalist for the NBCC Awards.

Juliet Grames is Associate Publisher at Soho Press, where she also acquires and edits literary fiction and the Soho Crime international crime fiction imprint.

Jacqueline Ko is an agent at the Wylie Agency, representing literary fiction and nonfiction, including work in translation. The Wylie Agency has offices in New York and London, and represents more than 900 clients internationally.


Come back to the Center for Fiction every third Tuesday of the month for the rest of the spring 2016 series. The last event in the series is on bookselling (May 17), and will feature a lively and candid discussion with booksellers, publicists, events organizers, and, as always, translators.


This is a co-presentation by the Bridge and the PEN America Translation Committee. 

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Editing, March 15

editing_imagethe second event in the spring 2016 series
co-presented by the PEN America Translation Committee


How do you edit a translation? What do you need to know, or not know? How do you deal sensitively and appropriately with a text written in another language, and the writer, translator, foreign editor, and other parties who might have had a hand in creating it? Four experienced editors—Lexy Bloom, Jeremy Davies, Sal Robinson, and Declan Spring—discuss the pleasures and puzzles of working on translations, from dealing with cultural differences to handling “translationese.”


Tuesday, March 15, 7PM
The Center for Fiction
17 East 47th Street, between 5th and Madison Aves
http://centerforfiction.org
The event is free but please RSVP here.


Moderator:
Sal Robinson has been an editor for international literature at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Melville House. With Bill Martin and Monika Zaleska, she runs the Bridge.

Panelists:
Lexy Bloom is Senior Editor at Vintage and Anchor Books and Senior Culinary Editor at Alfred A. Knopf, imprints of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group at Penguin Random House, Inc. She edits both fiction and nonfiction, focusing on works in translation and voices from around the world; as well as food writing and cookbooks. She has edited the work of award-winning and bestselling authors such as Haruki Murakami, Deb Perelman, Hanan al-Shaykh, Madhur Jaffrey, Mia Alvar, Alex Prud’homme, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and many others for Knopf, Pantheon and Vintage/Anchor. She has overseen the publications of the works of Irène Némirovsky, author of Suite Française, as well as the paperback editions of writers such as Claire Messud, Jhumpa Lahiri, Jennifer Egan, Hanya Yanagihara, and Abraham Verghese.

Jeremy M. Davies was for some years Senior Editor at Dalkey Archive Press. He is the author of two novels, Rose Alley (2009) and Fancy (2015), as well as The Knack of Doing, a collection of short fiction just out this month from David R. Godine.

Declan Spring is Vice President and Senior Editor at New Directions, where he has been working since 1991. He has edited books by Jorge Luis Borges, Horacio Castellanos-Moya, Inger Christensen, H.D., Thalia Field, Forrest Gander, Gustaw Herling, Laszlo Krasznahorkai, Enrique Vila-Matas, and Paul West.


Come back to the Center for Fiction every third Tuesday of the month for the rest of the spring 2016 series. Events to follow will be dedicated to contracts (April 19) and bookselling (May 17), and will feature lively and candid discussions with translators, editors, publishers, and booksellers.


This is a co-presentation by the Bridge and the PEN America Translation Committee.

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Breaking In, February 16

Breaking In

the first event in the spring 2016 series
“The Business of Literary Translation”
co-presented by the PEN America Translation Committee

The front door or the back window? 5 emerging and seasoned translators talk about how they got into the “house” of literary translation. 

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Does the existence of MFA programs make it easier than it used to be? How important is it to have mentors? And is it possible to make a living as a literary translator? Allison Markin Powell, Allison M. Charette, Heather Cleary, Katrine Øgaard Jensen, and Mary Ann Newman will discuss these and other subjects.


Tuesday, February 16, 7PM
The Center for Fiction
17 East 47th Street, between 5th and Madison Aves
http://centerforfiction.org
The event is free but please RSVP here.


Moderator:
Allison Markin Powell is a literary translator, editor, and publishing consultant in New York City. She has worked in the editorial departments of American and Japanese book and magazine publishing, and has translated works by Osamu Dazai, Hiromi Kawakami, and Fuminori Nakamura, among others. Her translation of Kawakami’s The Briefcase was nominated for the 2012 Man Asian Literary Prize, and the UK edition (Strange Weather in Tokyo) was nominated for the 2014 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. Powell currently serves as co-chair of PEN America’s Translation Committee, and she maintains the database http://www.japaneseliteratureinenglish.com.

Panelists:
Allison M. Charette translates literature from French into English. She received a 2015 PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grant for Naivo’s Beyond the Rice Fields, the first novel to be translated from Madagascar, forthcoming from Restless Books in 2017. She founded the Emerging Literary Translators’ Network in America (ELTNA.org), a networking and support group for early-career translators. Allison has published two book-length translations, in addition to short translated fiction that has appeared in Words Without Borders, The Other Stories, InTranslation, the SAND Journal, and others. Find her online at charettetranslations.com.

Heather Cleary’s translations and literary criticism have appeared in Two Lines, A Public Space, The Quarterly Conversation and Words Without Borders, among other publications. Her book-length translations include Sergio Chejfec’s The Planets (finalist, Best Translated Book Award 2013) and The Dark (nominee, ALTA’s National Translation Award 2014) and Poems to Read on a Streetcar, a selection of Girondo’s poetry published by New Directions (recipient, PEN and Programa SUR translation grants). She holds an MA in Comparative Literature from NYU and a PhD in Latin American and Iberian Cultures from Columbia University. She was a judge of the 2015 PEN Translation Prize, and is currently on the jury of the 2016 BTBA. In 2012 she co-founded the Buenos Aires Review—a digital, bilingual magazine of literature and culture.

Katrine Øgaard Jensen is a journalist, writer, and translator from the Danish.  She previously served as editor-in-chief of Columbia: A Journal of Literature and Art and as blog editor at Asymptote.  A two-time Thanks To Scandinavia scholar, she now edits the Words without Borders blog while serving as poetry judge for the Best Translated Book Award. Her translation of Ursula Andkjær Olsen’s poetry collection Third-Millennium Heart is forthcoming from Broken Dimanche Press in 2016. Katrine teaches fiction in Columbia University’s undergraduate creative writing program.

Mary Ann Newman is the Director of the Farragut Fund for Catalan culture in the U.S. She is a translator, editor, and occasional writer on Catalan culture. She has translated a novel and a short story collection by Quim Monzó, essays by Xavier Rubert de Ventós, and a collection of poems by Josep Carner. Her latest translation is Private Life, a Catalan classic by Josep Maria de Sagarra, published by Archipelago Books.


Come back to the Center for Fiction every third Tuesday of the month, February through May, for the rest of the series. Events to follow will be dedicated to editing (March 15), contracts (April 19), and bookselling (May 17), and will feature lively and candid discussions with translators, editors, publishers, and booksellers.


This is a co-presentation by the Bridge and the PEN America Translation Committee.

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Lisa Hayden and Eugene Vodolazkin, December 8

Lisa Hayden and Eugene Vodolazkin

discussing the translation of

Laurus-9781780747552

the story of a healer and holy fool, and his travels in medieval Europe


Tuesday, December 8, 7PM
BookCourt, http://bookcourt.com
163 Court Street


What people are saying:

“In Laurus, Vodolazkin aims directly at the heart of the Russian religious experience and perhaps even at that maddeningly elusive concept that is cherished to the point of cliché: the Russian soul.”  –Ken Kalfus, The New Yorker

“Kaleidoscopic in his language and reach, Vodolazkin takes us on a journey of discovery and absolution, threaded together through the various, often mystical lives of Arseny as a healer, husband, holy fool, pilgrim and hermit… The pages, dotted with names of anachronistic herbs and forgotten family lineages – not to mention Vodolazkin’s complex interplay between modern and medieval Russian – do not make for a simple or smooth translation. Lisa Hayden should be commended for her effort, for she achieves just that. Subtly, she blends the familiar and unfamiliar, trusting the organic process through which the book unfolds and allowing the language to speak for itself…” –Beau Lowenstern, Asymptote 


Participants:

Eugene Vodolazkin was born in Kiev and has worked in the department of Old Russian Literature at Pushkin House since 1990. He is an expert in medieval history and folklore and has numerous academic books and articles to his name. Laurus won both the National Book Award and the Yasnaya Polyana Book Award on its original publication in 2012. His debut novel, Solovyov and Larionov, is forthcoming from Oneworld in 2016. He lives with his family in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Lisa Hayden is a literary translator who lives in Scarborough, Maine. Her other translations from the Russian include Vladislav Otroshenko’s Addendum to a Photo Album and Marina Stepnova’s The Women of Lazarus. Her website, Lizok’s Bookshelf, focuses on contemporary Russian fiction. She received her MA in Russian literature at the University of Pennsylvania and lived in Moscow during 1992-1998.


This is a co-presentation by the Bridge and the PEN Translation Committee, PEN American Center. With special thanks to Becky Kraemer of Cursive Communications & Marketing.

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Aaron Lacayo, November 4

Aaron Lacayo: On Translating Gordon Matta-Clark’s Art Cards

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Wednesday, November 4th, 7PM

part of McNally Jackson Live, with Heidi Julavits, Sadie Stein, Alice Gregory, Caleb Crain, Hermione Hoby, Ariel Schrag, Anna Clyne, and Sarah Thomas

McNally Jackson Books, http://www.mcnallyjackson.com
52 Prince Street (btwn Lafayette and Mulberry)


Over the course of the 1970s, the artist Gordon Matta-Clark composed short, enigmatic, and wordplay-full notes on over a hundred index cards. As part of an evening dedicated to “private writing,” Aarón Lacayo will discuss how he translated the cards into Spanish for the first collection of them ever to appear in print.

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Aarón Lacayo is a writer, translator and a PhD candidate in the Spanish & Portuguese Department at Rutgers University. His Spanish translation of Gordon Matta-Clark’s conceptual poetry, (Art Cards / Fichas de Arte), was published by Sangría (Santiago de Chile, 2013). He has written about translation, poetry and cinema in journals such as Comparative Literature Studies, Carte Italiane and La Fusta. His literary interests include contemporary U.S., Latin American, and Italian literature. His English translation of Claudia Hernández’s novella, La han despedido de nuevo (They have fired her again), will come out later this year.


With thanks to Sangría Editora: http://www.sangriaeditora.com/
This is a co-presentation by the Bridge and the PEN Translation Committee, PEN American Center.

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Shelley Frisch & Catherine Porter, October 29

On Translating Nonfiction:
Shelley Frisch & Catherine Porter

Frisch and Porter final


Thursday, October 29, 6:30PM

McNally Jackson Books, http://www.mcnallyjackson.com
52 Prince Street (btwn Lafayette and Mulberry)


Shelley Frisch taught at Columbia University while serving as Executive Editor of The Germanic Review, then chaired the Haverford/Bryn Mawr Bi-College German Department before turning to translation full-time in the 1990s. She has published widely on German literature, film, cabaret, and the political and linguistic dimensions of exile, as well as on translation; her book on the origin of language theories, The Lure of the Linguistic, was published in 2004. Her many translations from the German include biographies of Nietzsche, Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, and Kafka, for which she was awarded a Modern Language Association Translation Prize and Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize.  Her translation of Karin Wieland’s Dietrich & Riefenstahl: Hollywood, Berlin, and a Century in Two Lives will be published by Liveright/Norton this fall, and she is completing her translation of the final volume of Reiner Stach’s Kafka biography trilogy, Kafka: The Early Years, to be published by Princeton University Press. The previous volumes, Kafka: The Decisive Years and Kafka: The Years of Insight, have garnered numerous awards, and were chosen by the TLS and The Guardian as a Best Book of the Year; The Years of Insight was also longlisted for the 2014 PEN Translation Award. Shelley Frisch co-directs international translation workshops in Switzerland, Germany, and Ireland with Karen Noelle, and lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

Catherine Porter received her doctorate in French literature from Yale University in 1972. She is a Visiting Professor at the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University, and Professor of French Emerita at the State University of New York College at Cortland, where she taught French at all levels and chaired the Department of International Communications and Culture for a total of ten years. She served as president of the Modern Language Association in 2009, introducing translation as the theme of the annual convention that year. She has authored a number of essays on foreign language pedagogy as well as on translation, and she served as co-editor, with Sandra Bermann, of Wiley-Blackwell‘s Companion to Translation Studies, published in 2014. A freelance translator in the humanities and the social sciences since the mid-1970s, Porter has published numerous essays and more than three dozen books in translation from the French, from Oswald Ducrot and Tzvetan Todorov’s Encyclopedic Dictionary of the Sciences of Language (Johns Hopkins, 1979) to Antoinette Fouque’s There Are 2 Sexes (Columbia, 2015). She is currently working, with Cornell colleague Susan Tarrow, on a collection of essays by the late French Hellenist Jean Bollack, The Art of Reading, from Homer to Paul Celan, for the Center for Hellenic Studies, and on Élisabeth Roudinesco’s acclaimed new biography, Freud in His Time and Ours, for Harvard University Press.


This is a co-presentation by the Bridge and the PEN Translation Committee, PEN American Center.

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